United States

FAST FACTS

NDTAC's Fast Facts Web pages present national and State longitudinal data on funding, program types, and student demographics for children and youth who are neglected, delinquent or at-risk and enrolled in Title I, Part D, Subpart 1 and Subpart 2 programs. National data on key academic outcomes and pre-posttest assessment results are also provided.

Select a State then a Subpart:

UNITED STATES: SUBPART 2

Go to: Funding, Programs and Students | Program Types | Students Served | Academic Outcomes | Academic Performance

I. Funding, Programs, and Students

Title I, Part D, Subpart 2 provides supplemental funds for education programs for youth who are neglected, delinquent or at-risk. Subpart 2 funds are awarded directly to State education agencies, which then award subgrants to local education agencies.

Funding Allocation, Number of Programs and Students Served
Program Information 2014–152015–162016–17
Subpart 2 Funding
United States $123,153,455.17 $114,181,278.63 $114,152,408.00
Number of Programs
United States 2,0872,0051,895
Number of Students Served
United States 282,973269,404265,035

II. Program Types

States may use Subpart 2 funds to assist educational programs for youth who are neglected and programs for youth in juvenile detention, juvenile corrections, and at-risk programs.

Programs for youth who are neglected serve youth placed in public or private residential facilities due to abandonment, neglect, or the death of their parents or guardians. Programs for youth who are delinquent serve youth in public or private institutions (e.g., detention or corrections facilities) who have been adjudicated delinquent or who are otherwise in need of supervision. At-risk programs target students who are at risk of academic failure, have a drug or alcohol problem, are pregnant or parenting, have been in contact with the juvenile justice system in the past, are at least 1 year behind the expected age/grade level, have limited English proficiency, are gang members, have dropped out of school in the past, or have a high absenteeism rate at school.

Student Participation Data

Student Participation by Program Type
Program Types United States
2014–152015–162016–17
At-Risk Programs 42,15815%41,32415%47,17918%
Neglected Programs 29,67510%28,37311%28,53011%
Juvenile Detention 155,02455%154,32856%133,05650%
Juvenile Corrections 51,66218%42,63516%52,90020%
Other Programs 4,4542%2,7441%3,3701%

III. Students Served

All State education agencies must provide data to the U.S. Department of Education (ED) on the students served in Part D programs, including information on gender, race/ethnicity, age, and disability and Limited English Proficiency (LEP) status.

Demographics

Nationally, in school year (SY) 2016–17, the majority (83 percent) of students benefitting from Title I, Part D funds in local education agency programs were between the ages of 14 and 18, followed by 11–13–year–olds (9 percent), 19–21–year–olds (5 percent) and students under the age of 11 (3 percent). Students were predominantly male (71 percent). These percentages reflect the national trends in age and gender also observed in SY 2014–15 and 2015–16. The racial/ethnic makeup of students in Title I, Part D, Subpart 2 in SY 2016–17 across the nation is presented below.

Race/Ethnicity Data

Student Participation by Race/Ethnicity
Race/Ethnicity United States
2014–152015–162016–17
American Indian or Alaska Native 6,4492%6,3812%6,3352%
Asian 2,3061%2,0841%2,1081%
Black or African American 98,38435%93,41735%90,72934%
Hispanic or Latino 67,90124%66,20325%63,28224%
Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander 8790%1,2310%9520%
White 97,38334%90,25534%91,21534%
Two or More Races 9,6713%9,7864%10,4134%
Other 00%00%00%
Total 0100%0100%0100%

States may not have provided racial/ethnic data for every student. Therefore, the number of students by race/ethnicity may be lower than the number of students served. Due to rounding, percentages may not total to 100%.

Student Subgroups

As of SY 2012–13, States began reporting data on the number of students with disabilities and the number of students who have LEP. The identification of these students should align with the State classification for Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) for students with disabilities and with Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act for students who have LEP.

Student Subgroup Data

Student Participation by Subgroup
Student Subgroups United States
2014–152015–162016–17
Students with Disabilities 66,89224%65,69124%68,46826%
LEP Students 15,5315%14,3565%14,2545%

IV. Academic Outcomes

All State education agencies must report on a series of academic and vocational outcomes attained by students enrolled in programs that receive Title I, Part D funds. The figures below feature four of the key performance measures: earning high school course credits, obtaining a high school diploma, enrolling in a GED program and earning a GED. These figures reflect the percentage of age-eligible students who attain these outcomes while enrolled in, or shortly after leaving, an educational program funded by Title I, Part D, Subpart 2.

Academic Outcomes Achieved While in Facility

Academic Outcomes Achieved While in Facility

Academic Outcomes Achieved While in Facility
Academic Outcomes United States
2014–152015–162016–17
Earned High School Course Credits (ages 13-21) 100,08338%106,37243%111,22045%
Obtained High School Diploma (ages 16-21) 5,7103%6,2024%7,9435%
Enrolled in a GED Program (ages 14-21) 9,3994%8,2283%9,0584%
Earned a GED (ages 16-21) 2,1731%2,4902%2,5892%
Academic Outcomes Achieved within 90 Days after Exit

Outcomes Achieved within 90 days after Exit Data

Academic Outcomes Achieved within 90 Days after Exit
Academic Outcomes United States
2014–152015–162016–17
Earned High School Course Credits (ages 13-21) 35,40613%34,98114%43,52318%
Obtained High School Diploma (ages 16-21) 1,6391%2,1341%1,9271%
Enrolled in a GED Program (ages 14-21) 1,7311%1,8221%1,6201%
Earned a GED (ages 16-21) 4690%5630%4620%

V. Academic Performance: Reading and Mathematics

ED requires that States report the pre- and posttest performances in reading and mathematics of long-term students who were enrolled in a program for 90 consecutive calendar days or longer. All State education agencies provide data on the progress (i.e., grade-level change) that long-term students demonstrate on pre- and posttests in reading and mathematics.

Reading

Reading Performance Data

Performance of Long-Term Students in Reading on Pre- and Posttests
Reading Pre- and Posttest Data United States
2014–152015–162016–17
Long-Term Students 74,21071,48180,254
Long-Term Students with Complete Pre-Posttest Data 38,59032,63636,696
Long-Term Students who Showed Negative Change from Pre- to Posttest 6,25316%5,25016%6,02516%
Long-Term Students who Showed No Change from Pre- to Posttest 8,94323%7,74524%8,86724%
Students who Showed Improvement from Pre- to Posttest 23,39461%19,64160%21,80459%

Mathematics

Mathematics Performance Data

Performance of Long-Term Students in Mathematics on Pre- and Posttests
Mathematics Pre- and Posttest Data United States
2014–152015–162016–17
Long-Term Students 74,21071,48180,254
Long-Term Students with Complete Pre-Posttest Data 38,08931,80235,364
Long-Term Students who Showed Negative Change from Pre- to Posttest 5,98416%4,92115%5,62816%
Students who Showed No Change from Pre- to Posttest 9,23824%7,86625%9,05026%
Long-Term Students who Showed Improvement from Pre- to Posttest 22,86760%19,01560%20,68657%

Definitions and Presentation of Data

Age-eligible: This term refers to the age range of students who could reasonably be expected to achieve a given outcome. For example, the age-eligible range for earning a high school diploma or GED is 16- to 21-years old. ED uses ranges for each outcome intended to capture the majority of students served across the country, but eligibility ranges may vary from State to State.

At-Risk programs: Programs operated (through local education agencies) that target students who are at risk of academic failure, have a drug or alcohol problem, are pregnant or parenting, have been in contact with the juvenile justice system in the past, are at least 1 year behind the expected age/grade level, have limited English proficiency, are gang members, have dropped out of school in the past, or have a high absenteeism rate at school.

Juvenile detention: A juvenile detention facility is a shorter term institution that provides care to children who require secure custody pending court adjudication, court disposition, or execution of a court order, or that provides care to children after commitment.

Juvenile corrections: A juvenile corrections institution is a public or private residential facility, other than a foster home, for children and youth who are delinquent. This type of facility offers care for children and youth who have been adjudicated delinquent or are in need of supervision.

Long-term: Students who are enrolled in a program for 90 consecutive calendar days or longer.

Neglected programs: Neglected programs offer care to children and youth who are neglected. These programs are conducted in public or private residential facilities, other than a foster home, that are operated primarily for the care of children who have been committed to the institution or voluntarily placed there under applicable State law due to abandonment, neglect, or death of their parents or guardians.

Data Sources

U.S. Department of Education, Budget Office

U.S. Department of Education, Data Office

  • CSPR for State Formula Grant Programs Under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as Amended by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001: 2014–15, 2015–16, and 2016–17. Data submitted by States to ED's Office of Student Achievement and School Accountability.
Additional data summaries related to the Title I, Part D program can be found on the following Web pages:

Data Presentation

For more information on Title I, Part D data context and methodology, please see the NDTAC Title I, Part D data information Web page. Some of the values that appear on the State Fast Facts pages may not fully align with the values reported in the CSPR. NDTAC provides extensive technical assistance to Title I, Part D programs and has in some instances clarified data based on information provided directly from States. Because of this and differing analytic approaches, NDTAC's Fast Facts pages may not fully align with the raw data in the data sources.